This is the start of the Student Entrepreneur Journal Series. There are students at UNLV who are working on a start up while going to school and we want to hear about their experience and share their stories. Not only can we learn from them, they get free publicity.

The first entrepreneur to kick off this series is Chester Ayos. Chester is a member of the Rebel Venture Fund but he is also the founder of RoVenture Consulting Group, a virtual management consulting firm that provides technological and management advice to some of the most innovative creative and emerging companies in the online gaming sector. RoVentures has created 2 successful games on the Roblox platform. They created their first game in 2014, Robloxian General Hospital which offers kids of all ages realistic roleplaying opportunities.

The next game created by Roventure Consulting was Robloxian Mountaineering, a game that provides kids a virtual mountaineering experience as they climb Mt. Everest. This gained a lot of traction, and has seen over 2.7 million players in the first year.

Chester’s reason for creating this company was the same reason anyone creates a company. There was a problem, and he wanted fix it. When Chester was in high school he was interested in the medical field, but there were no virtual games that offered a roleplaying experience as a doctor. There were games for other careers like a fireman, or police officer but none for a hospital and this is where Chester came in. He has been building this company since 2012 and has helped 1000’s of players learn what its like to be a doctor.

Even though going to school and working on a start up is challenging, it has been a great experience for Chester. Being a part of Rebel Venture Fund, and working on a start up has made him more comfortable with the risks of a start up, and taught him what to do in tough situations. “All start ups go through challenges; the most important thing is to just push through them.”

Chester spends about 30 hours per week on Roventures, which includes game development, marketing, customer interviews, and talking with the community. “The hardest part about growing a start up and attending school is time management. Sometimes you have an exam coming up, and a big project to do for the start up. Do you want to pass the class or make money?” Time management is crucial so that you still well in school but also continue to grow your start up. “School took priority as I became more flexible, if the start up didn’t work out I would have school to fall back on.”

To be a successful entrepreneur, while attending school or not, you have to be open minded and open to criticism. Chester created multiple games that all failed before he had his success in 2014. “If you don’t understand why you failed in the first place, you will not learn what you did wrong.”

So how do you be successful at starting a company while attending school? Chester’s advice to all the entrepreneurs out there is, “Make sure your business model is on point. If you start a business with no plan you are going in blind. Always listen to your employees, team, and customers.”

Thank you to Chester Ayos for giving us this great advice, and letting us learn from his experience. If you want to learn more about his company check out, www.roventureconsulting.com, or the Mt. Everest Climbing Role-play.

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About the Author

Brady Ard is a new venture MBA student at UNLV. He grew up in Vancouver, Washington, and received my B.S in Business finance from BYU-Idaho. He worked for 4 years in the restaurant industry as a server, bartender, and assistant manager as he completed his undergrad degree. He is currently working as an Audit Clerk for Affinity Gaming. He wants to build startups, and start his own company in the future.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of RVF or UNLV. In addition, thoughts and opinions are subject to change and this article is intended to provide an opinion of the author at the time of writing this article. All data and information is for informational purposes only.